Tag: CSR


Difference between descriptive ethics and normative ethics

What is the difference between descriptive ethics and normative ethics? What role do values play in each of these two approaches to ethics? Provide examples to illustrate your points.

Descriptive ethics is founded on the belief that humans are ‘hard-wired’ to be selfish. That is, they are for the most part absorbed in fulfilling their own desires and goals. The capitalist economy is a good example of this instinct in humans, whereby, ‘greed is good’ is an accepted mantra for business corporations and individuals alike. Descriptive ethics promotes a ego-centric decision making model, whereby, an individual is morally entitled to pursue his own happiness through independent action. Cultural relativism is another term coupled to descriptive ethics. This school of thought contends that what is right or wrong is specific to the particular cultural milieu. Normative ethics, on the other hand, takes a more didactic approach to human action in that it . . . Read More

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Should company law serve the interests of only those who contribute capital to companies or should it also consider public interest?

How well a business corporation performs in financial terms is significant for a broad group of people that includes potential/existing investors, creditors, employees or managers. With differing information needs and purposes, each category of stakeholders should be provided with data that is comprehensive, relevant and reliable, so as to allow an informed opinion to be reached on the corporation’s financial performance. However, all too often, the general public is left out of this equation.  A corporation’s operations have direct and indirect effect on the general public, who don’t have a “stake” in the company in the conventional use of the term.  Yet, business corporations are purely economic structures, whose sole purpose is profits and whose foresight stops with the next quarter.  This essay tries to discuss the existing norms of accountability, its deficiencies and areas that need improvement.

The only document that a company in the UK . . . Read More

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Affluenza: The All Consuming Epidemic by John de Graaf

John de Graaf’s well researched and eye-opening book “Affluenza: The All Consuming Epidemic” brings up several issues ailing contemporary industrial society, such as deceptive mass advertisements, over-population, environment damaging toxic dumping, corporate greed, etc. Of these, Corporate America has been chosen as the topic for this paper. The United States of America, being the world’s largest economy and the world’s only military superpower, can virtually dictate terms of trade for the rest of the world. And being the torch bearer of unfettered laissez faire capitalism, American business interests often dictate government policy decisions. This heady mix of wealth and power need to be counterbalanced by accountability and responsibility for the general public. But, going by the evidence presented by de Graaf in his book, the outcomes so far have been harmful for the people at large and the environment in which they live. In this context, one can understand the . . . Read More

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Environmental Protection & Corporate Social Responsibility

US postage stamps with the conservation messageIntroduction:

How well a business corporation performs in financial terms is significant for a broad group of people that includes potential/existing investors, creditors, employees or managers. With differing information needs and purposes, each category of stakeholders should be provided with data that is comprehensive, relevant and reliable, so as to allow an informed opinion to be reached on the corporation’s financial performance. However, all too often, the general public is left out of this equation. A . . . Read More

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