Author: M

A collection of high-quality academic essays.

The relationship between educational institutions and students

The three scholarly articles on the relationship between educational institutions and students are very insightful. The centre of their attention is the influence of student’s economic class on the quality and content of education received. But more importantly, class continues to influence and determine the quality and nature of an individual’s life beyond and after schooling years. In other words, the three authors posit in three different ways that economic class that an American is born into predetermines their course of life. The rest of this essay will flesh out this thesis.

The essay titled The Educated Global Citizen or Student Global Consumer? raises several important questions about the culture of education that has come to be accepted. Far from the ideal notions of education that the founding fathers of the nation envisioned, what we have today is the corporate takeover of schools and academies. The concept of advertising and sponsored programs have become so . . . Read More

Continue Reading

The key traits of North American Indian culture which flourished before the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors in 1492

The simplistic version of history suggests a primitive/tribal way of life for indigenous Americans. Such a simplification detracts from the community a rich, ecologically informed culture, as well as an egalitarian social organization. The first chapter in the book by Roark, Johnson and team attempts to flesh out a complete picture of North American Indian culture before the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors.

One of the key characteristics of Native Americans is their unique genealogy, which derives from African and Asian populations. Although this connection is not the most intuitive, anthropological studies using genetic markers have substantiated this understanding. In the late medieval period, they were believed to have adopted a hunter-gatherer mode of life. It is an important revelation, for everywhere else in the world agriculture and urbanization has already become entrenched. Bison was a great stock prey during the time as the ecology of the Great Plains suited it . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Compare and Contrast Paulo Freire and William Brickman

Both Paulo Freire and William Brickman stand as giants in the field of education. However, their views and concerns hardly ever converged. While Freire’s basic focus was the relation between education and socio-economy, Brickman’s scholarship was on comparative education at the international level. It is fair to say that these two areas are worlds apart. Yet, the work of both thinkers is integral to modern thought on education. Their theories and views continue to influence contemporary education professionals.

One of the major focus areas of Freire’s work was the role of education in maintaining the existing social order. In other words, he sought to answer the question of how the oppressed in society continues to remain so? If the purpose of education is to enlighten, and in consequence, liberate the individual, then why are human relationships ripe with domination of one party over the other? It is a fair question and the answer lies in the way content, structure and . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Summary and Reflection of ‘Future of Medicine: Perfection and Beyond’ (Chapter 3) of Physics of the Future by Michio Kaku

The chapter takes the reader through an imaginative journey of medicine in the future. Although some of the possibilities proposed appear like material from a science fiction novel, they are based on emerging scientific breakthroughs. One of the themes discussed in the chapter is the increasing mastery of human beings to ‘play God’. Evolving new technologies allow the medical professional to perform astounding feats of genetic engineering. This could happen at various stages of life – from neonatal to palliative. With this capability, people can augment their life spans, develop immunity to various viruses and even thwart cancer using nanotechnology.

In chapter 3, Michio Kaku makes predictions and depictions of future of medicine in all its possible manifestations. We read of ‘nanobots’ that would operate at sub-molecular levels in dealing with infections and diseases. The author also envisions advancement in stem cell extraction and utilization, whereby, new organs . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Minority parents and child discipline

Parenting styles have always varied from one culture to another.  And despite a degree of homogenization due to large-scale migrations in the 20th century, cultural roots of families continue to bear upon how children are raised.  In the United States, for example, parents from minority ethnicities tend to hold their children to a different standard of discipline than their Caucasian counterparts.  As researcher Lisa Fontes notes in her article that just as areas of emphasis vary between cultures so do modes and methods of punishment.  There are differences in the way children are punished by African American/Southern parents compared to their Caucasian/New England counterparts.  Such variations are seen in other minority groups like Hispanic Americans, Korean Americans, etc.

Chinese and Indian American parents’ methods and attitudes toward child discipline have particularly attracted comment and criticism.  For example, in these communities, emphasis on . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Key lifespan developmental issues in The Cider House Rules

Cider House Rules is a 1999 film produced by Richard Gladstein & co. Adapted from a novel of the same name by John Irving, the film garnered both commercial as well as critical success. The movie is of special relevance to American audiences, for it deals with the subject of abortion which has been a politically and culturally contentious issue for a long time. The plot is centered on the life of Homer Wells, an orphan, who grows up in an orphanage after being returned twice by his foster parents. The movie contains many poignant and touching moments in it that lend itself for psychological analysis. For example, from a developmental psychology viewpoint, the fact that Homer is returned twice to the orphanage was bound to leave deep scars on the formative psyche of the young boy, who would struggle to form lasting attachments to other humans as a consequence. Also, the manner in which he was treated by these couples was also abusive to a degree. These abusive relationships . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Recruitment and Hiring: Key laws, regulations and principles

Recruitment and Hiring is an important aspect of Human Resources Management, for it is here that candidate employees first come into contact.  In recent decades, the process of interviewing and screening candidates for possible employment has become more systematic and sophisticated.  Corporate laws have also caught up with the needs of organizations.  Vice versa, more regulations are imposed on companies to comply with basic standards during recruitment and hiring.  In other words, corporate laws pertaining to usage of employee/candidate information have gotten stringent over the years.  This is a positive development, for otherwise, important private information will be subject to misuse and exploitation. The rest of this essay will outline key laws, regulations and principles for recruiters to mull over as they discharge their duties in the HRM department.

It is common practice for employers to scrutinize past behavior of a potential employee and make sure that the . . . Read More

Continue Reading

What do Plato and Socrates believe is the reason for humans to do the right thing?

According to Socrates, a commitment to moral reasoning is an essential condition of a well-lived life.  An individual should base his actions upon the outcomes of such internal dialogues.  The exercise of self-examination and introspection as a way of arriving at moral truths is of paramount importance to Socrates.  So much so that he unequivocally declared that “an unexamined life is not worth living” (Vlastos, p.121).  This commitment to truth by way of rational, critical enquiry would eventually cost Socrates his life.  But, even when in sight of his impending death, Socrates calmly reasoned with his friends and supporters that accepting the judgment of the state is to follow the moral course of action and he refused to escape into exile. Socrates’ view of morality was espoused by his chief disciple Plato as well, who documented most of his master’s orations.

We can deduce Socrates and Plato’s views on proper human conduct from the reasons the former gives . . . Read More

Continue Reading

What were the charges against Socrates as recorded in the Apology?

Socrates is one of the most prominent Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic Age.  His powers of logical reasoning and the invention of the Socratic Method have left an enduring legacy on Western philosophy.  The ideas spawned by him were given further life and shape by his bright pupil Plato, who also documented much of what Socrates orated to his audience.    Although he was a prominent member of the Aristocratic class, his lack of deference to authority would ultimately lead to his tragic end.  In this tragedy lies heroism and moral fortitude.  Although deemed guilty by the then prevailing laws of Athens, he stands righteous in spirit.  Even when given the choice between a life in exile or immediate execution, he chose the latter as a matter of adhering to principle.  The following passages will elaborate this assessment.

Socrates was brought to trial by the democratic Athenian jury, which had scores to settle with prominent members of the previous regime.  . . . Read More

Continue Reading

Why is Aristotle known as the common-sense philosopher?

Born in 384 BC and believed to have died on 322 BC, Aristotle remains the figure head of Ancient Greek philosophy. He also founded the Peripatetic school of philosophy, which remains in currency even today. Aristotle was widely regard during his time and continues to be revered through the ages. It is perhaps his common-sense approach to philosophy which has endeared and sustained him to academics and laypeople alike. While also expounding on such specialized subjects as physics, metaphysics, linguistics, biology and ethics, Aristotle theorized a great deal on poetry, music, theatre, rhetoric and government. The latter group of subjects is of common interest and appeal to a wide audience. This is one reason why he is considered a common-sense philosopher.

Also, during 3rd century BC, no advanced methods of logical deductions were devised yet. As a result, Aristotle had to employ simpler methods bordering on common-sense to perform his analyses. For example, with the limited . . . Read More

Continue Reading